Skateboard Care Instructions

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Thanks for your recent purchase of a skateboard from Aquatique!
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Skateboarding is an excellent sport for fun and fitness, however, skateboarding by nature can be very harsh on your body and the equipment you use so it’s important to know how to take care of yourself and your board so you can stay rolling for longer!

Looking After Yourself

  Warming up: Before starting a session it’s a good idea to warm your body up prior to even getting on your board. Some simple dynamic exercises and stretches can help to increase blood flow and flexibility which means you’re less likely to injure yourself and can skate for longer
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 Pad up!: Inexperienced skaters or anyone looking to do any sort of vert or bowl skating should       consider grabbing a set of pads or at least a helmet. As well as helping to avoid broken bones and nasty scrapes, pads can help boost confidence and allow you to push your skating further
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Learn how to fall: Unfortunately falling is a part of skateboarding, luckily there is a safe way to do it and that is ROLL OUT! Rather than putting your hands out in front of you to break your fall, tuck your chin into your chest and roll out, your wrists will appreciate it
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Skate wisely: A huge part of skating is pushing yourself and getting out of your comfort zone, but start small, skate within your ability. Don’t start by bombing the biggest hill you can find. Empty carparks are an ideal spot to get the basics down, just be cautious of glass and other debris, it’s a good idea to take a broom with you so you can sweep the area you intend to skate.
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  Appropriate footwear: Skateboarding is particularly harsh on your shoes, especially if you’re practising tricks that require you to slide the upper side of your shoe across the griptape such as ollies and kickflips. Most skaters will choose a suede shoe as these tend to be more durable than canvas or synthetic shoes. It’s usually a good idea to purchase a pair of shoes specifically for skateboarding so you don’t wear out your daily use shoes too quickly.
It may also be worth purchasing some Shoe Goo which is a product you apply to your shoes that sets like rubber. It’s handy for pre-emptively applying to the parts of your shoe that receive the most abuse during skateboarding or for patching up holes to get the most out of your shoes.
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Looking After Your Board
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Whether you bought a longboard, cruiser or a trick board there are a few simple things you can remember to get the most out of your board and keep it performing its best.
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Avoid water: Skateboards aren’t big fans of water. As fun as it can be skating in the rain or over wet ground it’s not great for your board. Bearings will seize if allowed to corrode, decks will waterlog, becoming heavy and brittle and hardware and trucks will rust making it difficult to replace them.
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Setting up your board: One of the first things you will normally do with your new board is set it up in a way that suits you, this usually means adjusting the tension of your trucks. Experienced skaters will appreciate the responsiveness of a loose set of trucks, but for a beginner, tighter trucks will offer more stability while sacrificing some turning ability.
It’s important though not to over tighten your trucks which can cause the rubber bushings in your trucks to break. A good starting point for setting up your trucks is to tighten the back truck fairly tight, not to the point the bushing is bulging though, and leave the front truck about half a turn less to allow yourself to turn better.
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 Bearing maintenance: As mentioned earlier, bearings can seize if exposed to moisture and are allowed to corrode. As you ride, your bearings will also take in dirt and debris and over time the lubricant inside them will dry out. You will know if your bearings are dirty or dry as they will start to hiss when they spin and will not spin as fast or for as long, when this happens it’s time to replace them, or if they allow for it, to clean them.
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Most complete skateboards will come with sealed bearings which are unable to be cleaned as the metal shields on these cannot be removed. However, if your bearings have rubber shields they can usually be removed to expose the ball bearings within. To clean these, soak the bearings with either isopropyl alcohol or even a household citrus cleaner, dry them with a hair dryer and add two – three drops of a bearing cleaner such as Bones Speed Cream or ProTecta Skate Lubricant, avoid using heavy oils or WD40 as these will clog the bearings and stop them from spinning.